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Théâtre Robert-Houdin (Second location 1854-1920s)

Category: Theatres
Address: 8 Boulevard des Italiens, 75009 Paris, France
GPS coordinates: (48.8716728, 2.3382832)
Tags:
Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin Georges Méliès Emile Robert-Houdin Robert Houdin
Entered by: Zadig
Description:
Theatre Robert-Houdin was created in 1854 by Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin in Paris on the first floor of 8 Boulevard des Italiens, Paris, after moving in December 1852 from its first location in Rue de Valois.
The theatre was 17 meters long, 6 meters wide and 4 meters high, and seated 225 people. Robert-Houdin himself never appeared there. He later passed it to his brother-in-law, Hamilton.
Ownership passed then from Hamilton to Cleverman (François Lahire), then in 1873 to Robert-Houdin's son Emile.
Emile was too busy to perform at the theatre, so he arranged for Pierre Edouard Brunnet to present the show. After his death, Emile's widow sold the theatre to Georges Méliès in 1888.
Georges Méliès reopened it in October that year and developed many stage illusions there. The Théâtre Robert-Houdin became then renowned as the most famous magic theaters in Paris. Over the next decade Méliès devised over twenty-five major stage illusions, many of which were later to inspire his films. His films actually became part of the repertory there and many employed elaborate sets to make it appear as though they were being performed on the stage.
The theater closed with the onset of the First World War and was eventually demolished in the 1920s to make way for the Boulevard Haussmann.
Note: GPS coordinates indicate the approximate location.
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Photo of Théâtre Robert-Houdin (Zadig)
Photo of Théâtre Robert-Houdin (Zadig)